Lab Home | Phone | Search
Center for Nonlinear Studies  Center for Nonlinear Studies
 Home 
 People 
 Current 
 Affiliates 
 Alumni 
 Visitors 
 Students 
 Research 
 ICAM-LANL 
 Quantum 
 Publications 
 Publications 
 2007 
 2006 
 2005 
 2004 
 2003 
 2002 
 2001 
 2000 
 <1999 
 Conferences 
 Workshops 
 Sponsorship 
 Talks 
 Colloquia 
 Colloquia Archive 
 Seminars 
 Postdoc Seminars Archive 
 Quantum Lunch 
 CMS Colloquia 
 Q-Mat Seminars 
 Q-Mat Seminars Archive 
 Archive 
 Kac Lectures 
 Dist. Quant. Lecture 
 Ulam Scholar 
 Colloquia 
 
 Jobs 
 Students 
 Summer Research 
 Student Application 
 Visitors 
 Description 
 Past Visitors 
 Services 
 General 
 PD Travel Request 
 
 History of CNLS 
 
 Maps, Directions 
 CNLS Office 
 T-Division 
 LANL 
 
Monday, January 29, 2018
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
CNLS Conference Room (TA-3, Bldg 1690)

Colloquium

Accelerated and Stabilized Meshfree Methods for Extreme Events Modeling

J. S. Chen
University of California, San Diego

Meshfree methods such as the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method (RKPM) are well suited for modeling materials and solids undergoing fracture and damage processes, and nodal integration is a natural choice for this class of problems. However, nodal integration suffers from spatial instability, and the excessive material deformation and damage process could also lead to kernel instability in RKPM. This presentation introduces the recent advances in nodal integration for meshfree methods that are stable, accurate, and with optimal convergence. A variationally consistent integration (VCI) is introduced to allow correction of many low order quadrature rules to achieve optimal convergence, and stabilization techniques with implicit gradient are developed for nodal integration. Independent to the quadrature rules, a quasi-linear Reproducing Kernel approximation is constructed to address the kernel instability issue. Several RKPM shock algorithms are also formulated under the variationally consistent nodal integration framework. The application of the new RKPM formulation for fracture to damage multiscale modeling, and their applications to the modeling of extreme events, are demonstrated. The demonstration problems include the modeling of man-made disasters such as fragment-impact processes, penetration, shock and blast events, as well as simulation of natural disasters such as landslide.

Host: Duan Zhang