Lab Home | Phone | Search
Center for Nonlinear Studies  Center for Nonlinear Studies
 Home 
 People 
 Current 
 Affiliates 
 Alumni 
 Visitors 
 Students 
 Research 
 ICAM-LANL 
 Quantum 
 Publications 
 Publications 
 2007 
 2006 
 2005 
 2004 
 2003 
 2002 
 2001 
 2000 
 <1999 
 Conferences 
 Workshops 
 Sponsorship 
 Talks 
 Colloquia 
 Colloquia Archive 
 Seminars 
 Postdoc Seminars Archive 
 Quantum Lunch 
 CMS Colloquia 
 Q-Mat Seminars 
 Q-Mat Seminars Archive 
 Archive 
 Kac Lectures 
 Dist. Quant. Lecture 
 Ulam Scholar 
 Colloquia 
 
 Jobs 
 Students 
 Summer Research 
 Student Application 
 Visitors 
 Description 
 Past Visitors 
 Services 
 General 
 PD Travel Request 
 
 History of CNLS 
 
 Maps, Directions 
 CNLS Office 
 T-Division 
 LANL 
 
Monday, April 04, 2016
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
CNLS Conference Room (TA-3, Bldg 1690)

Colloquium

Stem Cells: Interplay Between Complex Data and Models

Qing Nie
University of California, Irvine

Stem cells are a critical building block of life. Embryonic stem cells can differentiate into cells forming ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm during development, and adult stem cells can maintain the normal turnover of regenerative tissues (e.g. blood, skin, intestinal crypts). Recently, there has been an explosion of data on stem cells at various biological scales (e.g. gene expression and epigenetic measurements, lineage tracing, and molecules for intercellular communications). While data collected through different cell lines and animal models provide tremendous details on individual elements under various conditions, many gaps of knowledge and understanding remain on how stem cells carry out their remarkable functions and complex tasks. Mathematical models connecting interacting elements at different scales enable integration of massive, heterogeneous datasets collected with varying methods. In this talk, I will present several modeling frameworks with different complexity on multistage cell lineages driven by stem cells, which account for diffusive signaling molecules, regulatory networks, individual cells, mechanics, and evolution. Questions of our interest include role of feedbacks, stem cell niche for spatial organization, crosstalk between epigenetic and gene regulations, and cellular plasticity. In particular, I will discuss our recent effort on connecting modeling and complex experimental data to elucidate principles for stem cell dynamics in development and regeneration.

Host: Youfang Cao